Ambulance Service of New South Wales
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How to call Triple Zero (000)

From mobile phones

Where possible, it is always best to call Triple Zero (000) from a fixed phone to avoid issues such as poor reception, limited or no network coverage and low battery when you use a mobile phone.

However, if you have no alternative but to use a mobile phone you can still dial Triple Zero (000).

According to The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA):

"Special roaming capabilities of the vast majority of mobile phones when calling Triple Zero (000) mean that when you are out of your service provider's coverage area but are in another carrier's mobile phone network coverage area, your call will be carried on the other carrier's network.

However, it is important to realise that if there is no mobile coverage, you will not be able to reach the Emergency Call Service via a mobile phone, and alternative devices, such as personal location beacons (PLBs)* should be considered. PLBs are equipped to send a distress signal with location details on a dedicated radio frequency that communicates with Search and Rescue operators.

112 is a secondary emergency number that can be dialled from mobile phones in Australia. Special capabilities, including roaming, once only existed when dialling 112, however mobile phones manufactured since January 2002 also provide these capabilities when dialling Triple Zero (000) to access the emergency call service. It is important to realise that if there is no mobile coverage on any network, you will not be able to reach the emergency call service via a mobile phone, regardless of which number you dialled."
Ambulance does not have the capacity to receive an SMS text message from mobile phones in an emergency.

* For bushwalkers in the Blue Mountains, PLBs donated by Benbro Electronics are available from on loan from the NPWS Blue Mountains Heritage Centre at Blackheath, and after hours at the Katoomba or Springwood Police Stations.

Using VoIP

Triple Zero (000) can be called from certain VoIP services.

According to The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA):

"Providers of two-way VoIP services, which would allow you to make and receive calls, must provide you with access to the emergency call service.

Providers of one-way VoIP services that allow you to make calls only, are also obliged to provide you with access to the emergency call service unless they clearly inform you that such access is not available and you acknowledge this limitation.

If it's important to you that you can make emergency calls from your VoIP service, check with your VoIP provider about access to emergency calls."

Non-English speakers

All callers should dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency, regardless of their level of English.
If a control centre officer experiences difficulty in understanding a caller they may access the interpreter service. The interpreter service will contact the emergency caller and establish a three-way conversation with the control centre to facilitate communication.

To assist people whose first language is not English, fact sheets in several community languages can be found under Multilingual Resources on the Publications page of our website. Additionally, the TIS National website provides many resources for people whose first language is not English.

 

Hearing or speech impairment

People with hearing or speech impairments can access emergency services by:

  • TTY - dial 106
  • Landline - dial 1800 555 727 and ask for Triple Zero (000)
  • Internet relay - log on and ask for Triple Zero (000) - NOTE: calls to Internet relay cannot be given priority until you have connected with a relay officer.

 

TTY
The 106 number provides the same service as the Triple Zero (000) emergency service, but is only for people who are deaf or have a hearing or speech impairment.

This text based emergency service allows callers to pass on text information to a relay officer, who dials the correct emergency service and relays the conversations. 106 is a toll-free number provided as part of the National Relay Service (NRS).

Landline
There is a separate emergency call procedure for Speak and Listen callers who use a landline or mobile phone rather than a TTY. In an emergency, dial 1800 555 727 and then ask for Triple Zero (000).The relay officer will dial the correct service and stay on the line to help you, if necessary, communicate with the emergency service.

Internet relay
If you are using internet relay, you can ask the relay officer to connect you to Triple Zero (000). You can make an internet relay call on your computer, laptop or Smartphone via the NRS website or instant messenger. Like TTY, you can type your message and the relay officer will contact emergency services on your behalf. However, unlike a call to 1800 555 727 or to 106, this cannot be identified as an emergency call and cannot be given any priority until you have been connected to a relay officer.

More information on these services can be found on the National Relay Service website.

106logo 106 is a text-based emergency number for people who are deaf or who have a hearing or speech impairment. This service operates using a textphone (TTY) or a computer with  modem access.